Posts tagged 'paul apostle'

  • 1 Corinthians: Chapter 1 (verses 26-31)

    In the last six verses of 1 Corinthians 1, Paul makes the point that God has His own way of doing things.

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Corinthians: Chapter 1 (verses 17-25)

    Paul wrote, For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with words of eloquent wisdom, lest the cross of Christ be emptied of its power

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Corinthians: Chapter 1 (verses 4-16)

    Paul appeals for the Corinthians to agree, so that there will be no divisions among them.

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • The Book of 1 Corinthians: Introduction

    The city of Corinth, situated on a narrow land bridge between the Peloponnese region and mainland Greece, was a prosperous city in Paul’s time due to its location and harbors.

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians, Chapter 6 (verses 6-18)

    This is the final article in this series, covering the last chapter of Paul’s letter to the Galatians.

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 6 (verses 5:25–6:5)

    While the first two verses here are part of Galatians chapter 5, most commentators consider them to be the first two verses of chapter 6. Accordingly, I am including them as part of Galatians 6.

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 5 (verses 13-24)

    The previous article covered the first part of Galatians chapter 5, ending with verse 12. We’ll continue here with verse 13.

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 5 (verses 2–12)

    The Apostle Paul taught the Galatian believers that through faith in Christ they had been set free from following the Mosaic law; however, they had returned to the old covenant, believing that they needed to undergo circumcision. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 4 (verses 4:21–5:1)

    The Apostle Paul continues to exhort his readers to live in freedom from the Old Testament law. He tries to help the Galatians to see the folly of reverting to the law, and reminds his readers that those who trust in God’s promise ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 4 (verses 1–20)

    Paul ended Galatians chapter 3 with the statement: If you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise.1 In Galatians 4, he goes on to explain the significance of being Abraham’s heirs. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 3 (verses 15–29)

    In the first part of Galatians 3, the apostle Paul made the point that the Galatian believers did not need to be circumcised in order to be part of the people of God, the family of Abraham. What was needed to receive the blessing ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 3 (verses 1–14)

    In Galatians chapter 2, having written that he had been crucified with Christ and that Christ lived within him, Paul stated that he lived by faith in the Son of God. He then moved on to chapter 3. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 2 (verses 11–21)

    When Cephas came to Antioch, I opposed him to his face, because he stood condemned.1

    Antioch was one of the larger cities in the Roman Empire, with a population estimated at 250,000 people, 25,000 of which were Jewish. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 2 (verses 1–10)

    In Galatians chapter 1, Paul gives the personal testimony of his conversion and how he went to Arabia and then returned to Damascus. Three years later, he went to Jerusalem, where he met with Peter and James for fifteen days; ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • The Book of Galatians: Chapter 1 (Verses 11–24)

    In verse 10 of Galatians chapter 1, Paul posed the question of whether he was seeking the approval of man or of God, and stated that if he were trying to please men, he wouldn’t be a servant of Christ. He continued with: ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • The Book of Galatians: Introduction

    The book of Galatians is a letter (or epistle) that the Apostle Paul wrote to the churches of Galatia, a province of Anatolia (modern-day Turkey). In Paul’s day, the province of Galatia touched the Black Sea ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 2 Thessalonians: Chapter 3 (Part 2)

    Earlier in 2 Thessalonians chapter 3, Paul made the point that he and his partners had the right to receive financial aid from the Thessalonian church, but chose not to accept such aid in order to be an example for the believers to imitate. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 2 Thessalonians: Chapter 3 (Part 1)

    This third chapter of 2 Thessalonians is the final chapter of Paul’s epistles to the Thessalonian believers.

    Finally, brothers, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may speed ahead and be honored, as happened among you, ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • 2 Thessalonians: Chapter 2 (Part 2)

    Previously, in chapter 2:1–8, Paul wrote that the lawless one will be revealed, whom the Lord Jesus will kill with the breath of his mouth and bring to nothing by the appearance of his coming. He then continued to describe the lawless one: ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 2 Thessalonians: Chapter 2 (Part 1)

    After writing 2 Thessalonians chapter 1, which provided an introduction to his second letter to the church in Thessalonica, Paul moved on to the body of his letter in chapter 2. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 2 Thessalonians: Chapter 1

    The second letter to the Thessalonians was probably written around AD 51–52, shortly after 1 Thessalonians. Like 1 Thessalonians, the authors were Paul, Silvanus (Silas), and Timothy, and the recipients were the church ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 5 (Part 2)

    Having responded to the Thessalonians’ questions regarding love amongst the believers, what happens to the dead in Christ, and the timing of the day of the Lord, Paul moved on to speak about leadership in the Thessalonian church. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 5 (Part 1)

    At the end of 1 Thessalonians 4, Paul spoke of the dead in Christ who will be raised first, and the living who will be caught up into the air with them to meet the Lord and to always be with Him. He instructed the Thessalonian ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 4 (Part 2)

    Having covered the topic of sexual immorality in verses 3–8,1 Paul moved on to address another problem that had arisen in the Thessalonian church.

    Now concerning brotherly love you have no need for anyone to write to you, ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 4 (Part 1)

    In the fourth chapter of Paul’s first letter to the Thessalonians, he begins the first sentence with the word “finally”—an indicator that he’s transitioning to a different subject.

    Finally, then, brothers, we ask and urge you in the Lord Jesus, ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 3

    Having fled Thessalonica due to persecution, the apostle Paul wrote to the Thessalonian church and told them that he had made more than one attempt to return to them, but Satan hindered us.1 Paul and his companions, ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 2 (Part 2)

    In the first part of chapter 2 of 1 Thessalonians, Paul had reminded the Thessalonian Christians that he and his companions did not seek glory and they didn’t make any demands of these new Christians. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam


  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 2 (Part 1)

    After the apostle Paul, Silvanus (also called Silas), and Timothy departed Thessalonica due to persecution, they went to Achaia, a Roman province in the south of Macedonia.1 After spending some time in Achaia, ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Chapter 1

    The first of Paul’s and his partners’ letters to the Thessalonians is divided into five parts. The first part, the introduction (in 1 Thessalonians 1:1–10), is the shortest, containing ten verses. ...

    by Peter Amsterdam

  • 1 Thessalonians: Introduction

    The New Testament Epistles 1 and 2 Thessalonians were written by the apostle Paul, probably sometime between AD 49–51. They are considered to be among Paul’s earliest letters. The book of Acts also touches on the events ...

    by Peter Amsterdam